Native land use, traditional knowledge and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay bioregion

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Hudson Bay Programme = Programme sur la Baie d"Hudson , Ottawa
Indigenous peoples -- Hudson Bay Region -- Economic conditions., Land use -- Hudson Bay Region., Subsistence economy -- Hudson Bay Region., Hudson Bay Region -- Economic condit
Statementby Helen Fast & Fikret Berkes.
ContributionsBerkes, Fikret., Hudson Bay Programme.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD319.H83 F38 1994
The Physical Object
Pagination33, [11] p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15466041M
ISBN 100919996531
OCLC/WorldCa30076835

Native land use, traditional knowledge and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay bioregion. Ottawa: Hudson Bay Programme = Programme sur la Baie d'Hudson, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Helen B Fast; Fikret Berkes; Hudson Native land use Programme.

Details Native land use, traditional knowledge and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay bioregion FB2

Native land use, traditional knowledge and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay bioregion Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 1. Land use--HudsonBay Region. Subsistence economy--HudsonBay Region. Native peoples-­ Hudson Bay Region--Economicconditions.

Berkes, Fikret. Hudson Bay Programme. III. Title. Native land use, traditional knowledge and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay bioregion book knowledge and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay bioregion / by Helen Fast & Fikret Berkes.

HD H83 F38 Subsistence in the Hudson Bay bioregion: land use economy and ethos / Helen Barbara Fast. Native land use, traditional. knowledge and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay. bioregion. Technical paper prepared by the Hudson Bay But to our best knowledge.

Fast, H., Berkes, F., Native Land Use, Traditional Knowledge, and the Subsistence Economy in the Hudson Bay Bioregion. Technical paper prepared for the Hudson Bay Programme, University of Manitoba, Natural Resources Institute, Winnipeg, MBCited by:   Traditional ecological knowledge includes an intimate and detailed knowledge of plants, animals, and natural phenomena, the development and use of appropriate technologies for hunting, fishing, trapping, agriculture, and forestry, and a holistic knowledge, or "world view" which parallels the scientific discipline of ecology (Berkes ).

Fast, H. and F. Berkes. Native land use, traditional knowledge, and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay bioregion. The Hudson Bay Programme, Canadian Arctic Resources Committee, p. Google Scholar. Contributions of traditional knowledge to understanding climate change in the Canadian Arctic - Volume 37 Issue - Dyanna Riedlinger, Fikret Berkes northern subsistence and land-based economies.

In: Mayer, N., and Avis, traditional ecological knowledge of Inuit and Cree in the Hudson Bay bioregion.

Ottawa: Canadian Arctic Resources. The integrated management program is designed to address multiple-use conflicts in marine waters. An example of multiple use in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region is provided in Fig.

the Mackenzie Delta, three areas have been designated to protect beluga whale habitat from industrial development, and there are a number of Inuvialuit whaling camps in Mackenzie Bay and Kugmallit Bay.

A Land Acknowledgement is a formal statement that recognizes and respects Indigenous Peoples as traditional stewards of this land and the enduring relationship that exists between Indigenous Peoples and their traditional territories.

Hear what it means to members of the Native American and Indigenous Peoples Steering Group at Northwestern here. Introduction: In Canada, unique food security challenges are being faced by Aboriginal people living in remote-northern communities due to the impacts of climate change on subsistence harvesting.

This study used traditional environmental knowledge (TEK) to investigate whether there was a temporal relationship between extreme climatic events in the summer ofand fish die-offs in the. production of country food for subsistence.

This land-based economy is typically one-quarter to one-half of the total local economy (the rest being the wage and transfer sectors) (Table ). The compilation of data from several dozen studies across the Hudson Bay Bioregion has produced a.

* National parks, reserves or even restrictive land use policies in general should not be seen as foreclosing indigenous economic or self-development opportunities.

Indeed, in some parts of the world argument often centers on the "retention of resource-extraction. The papers in this volume were selected from presentations made in a number of sessions on traditional ecological knowledge (TEK), held as part of the Common Property Conference.

Papers explore the underlying concepts of TEK, address transmission of TEK and its integration into environmental impact assessment, describe the commonalities between natural law and collective wisdom and Native land Reviews: 1.

1. the continuation of the opportunity for subsistence uses by rural residents of Alaska, including both Natives and non-Natives, on the public lands and by Alaska Natives on Native lands is essential to Native physical, economic, traditional, and cultural existence and to non-Native physical, economic, traditional, and social existence.

been actively researching aboriginal land use in an effort to defend the resource base from the incursions of outsiders (M.

Weinstein, pers. comm., ). Fast and Berkes () listed 16 land use studies from the Hudson Bay bioregion alone, which was double the number in Weinstein’s () selective inventory for that region.

Fast, Helen and Fikret Berkes. Native Land Use, Traditional Knowledge and the Subsistence Economy in the Hudson Bay Bioregion. Technical Paper Prepared for the Hudson Bay Bioregion. JanuaryCanadian Arctic Resources Committee (CARC) and Environmental Committee of Sanikiluaq and Rawson Academy of Aquatic Science (RAAS).

Feit, Harvard. The research has resulted in a book, Voices from the Bay: Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Inuit and Cree in the Hudson Bay Bioregion. Sanikiluaq received a award from the Friends of the United Nations citing it as one of 50 exemplary communities, worldwide, committed to building a.

The original article Local Knowledge, Subsistence Harvests and Social-Ecological Complexity in James Bay appeared in Human Ecology Vol. 37, Voices from the Bay: Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Inuit and Cree in the Hudson Bay Bioregion, Canadian Arctic Resources Committee, Ottawa.

to former native economic and management activities. Na-tive Americans have influenced Sierran landscapes over many generations. Their traditional knowledge of former abun-dances, composition, density, and quality of plant and ani-mal species extends to time periods long before the advent of governmental land management.

Their land-use practices. There is concern of avian influenza virus (AIV) infections in humans. Subsistence hunters may be a potential risk group for AIV infections as they frequently come into close contact with wild birds and the aquatic habitats of birds while harvesting.

This study aimed to examine if knowledge and risk perception of avian influenza influenced the use of protective measures and attitudes about. Voices from the bay: traditional ecological knowledge of Inuit and Cree in the Hudson Bay bioregion by Miriam Anne McDonald regional planning and land-use planning, conservation of environmentally significant areas, mineral development, renewable resources management, inland water resources, ocean management, and development in the.

The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is a hypercarnivorous bear whose native range lies largely within the Arctic Circle, encompassing the Arctic Ocean, its surrounding seas and surrounding land is a large bear, approximately the same size as the omnivorous Kodiak bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi).

A boar (adult male) weighs around – kg (–1, lb), while a sow (adult female. Because of limited use of existing knowledge and lack of specific data on key resources, the land use dialogue among the reindeer herding communities, other land users and agencies has been.

Published inVoices from the Bay: Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Inuit and Cree in the Hudson Bay Bioregion was a ground-breaking publication that documented the traditional ecological knowledge, concerns, and visions of the local Inuit and Cree. The book has a number of sections that include narrative, images, diagrams, and maps.

Download Native land use, traditional knowledge and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay bioregion FB2

Bear oil was used as a natural emetic to stop the disease's spread by the Hudson Bay area Cree during the epidemic. Other indigenous treatments were not recorded by Europeans because the knowledge was considered sacred.

By the early s, Native Americans had begun developing additional methods to prevent infection. Narwhals occur in remote North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean and occur through out the eastern Canadian High Arctic, including Baffin Bay, northern Hudson Bay, and Hudson Straight.

The narwhal is called narval in French and is sometimes referred to as the sea unicorn for the unique, up to 3 m long, spiraled tusk formed from one anterior tooth in. been actively researching aboriginal land use in an effort to defend the resource base from the incursions of outsiders (M. Weinstein, pers.

comm., ). Fast and Berkes () listed 16 land use studies from the Hudson Bay bioregion alone, which was double the number in Weinstein's () selective inventory for that region.

Start studying Geography Practice Test Ch 3,4,5. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

Description Native land use, traditional knowledge and the subsistence economy in the Hudson Bay bioregion PDF

Americans also used the debts the Choctaws had incurred as leverage for land. The Americans acquired their first part of Choctaw territory in Some Choctaws tried to adjust to the new economy by adopting American-style agriculture, raising livestock, and espousing values that put more emphasis on the individual and less on the group.

Traditional land-based harvesting activities are economically valuable for the region and can reduce external economic dependence. Moreover, as there are many physical, nutritional, and social benefits of this practice, it is a vital, well-established component of health and well-being in Canadian Aboriginal communities [ 20 ].Whale Cove (ᑎᑭᕋᕐᔪᐊᖅ in Inuktitut syllabics) (Tikiraqjuaq, meaning "long point"), is a hamlet located 74 km (46 mi) south southwest of Rankin Inlet, km (90 mi) northeast of Arviat, in Kivalliq Region, Nunavut, Canada, on the western shore of Hudson Bay.

The community is named for the many beluga whales which congregate off the coast. Fast, Helen and Fikret Berkes. Native Land Use, Traditional Knowledge and the Subsistence Economy in the Hudson Bay Bioregion. Technical Paper Prepared for the Hudson Bay Bioregion. JanuaryCanadian Arctic Resources Committee (CARC) and Environmental Committee of Sanikiluaq and Rawson Academy of Aquatic Science (RAAS).